moroccan sass with a rockin' ass

Representation, You’re Doing It… so, so badly

rambleonamazon:

Finally continuing my series on existing canonical trans representation, this week we’re going to look at Futurama.

The Show

image

I’m not entirely sure how you could miss Futurama; it’s one of those pop culture icons that you can learn about even if you aren’t a direct fan. But if you slept from 1999 until now, here are the basics: Futurama is an animated sci-fi adventure show and sitcom created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons), and revolving around the intergalactic delivery company “Planet Express.” It has a LARGE recurring cast, but the core cast consists of Leela, a kung-fu cyclops space pilot, Fry, a delivery boy cryogenically frozen in 1999, and Bender, a shiftless, alchohol, kleptomaniac robot.

Episodes run the gamut from comedy to heart-wrenching beauty (I have yet to meet anyone who doesn’t cry at the end of “Jurassic Bark”), and the humor itself is anywhere from topical and witty to horrendously outdated. The cast is fairly diverse, though the minority members range wildly between episodes from well-developed characters to shallow stereotypes. Likewise, gender representation on the show can be anything from thoughtful examination to painful, thoughtless stereotypes.

Unfortunately, the one place Futurama consistently shoots for the lowest common denominator is trans representation.

Meet Bender

image

We’re looking at season 4, episode 13: Bend Her. Bender, as a self-important conman, plots to fan his ego by winning gold medals at the Olympics, only to be discouraged when he sees the incredible athletic prowess of the competing robots. Instead, he decides to enter as a fembot, and handily wins five gold medals (because it’s not like female Olympic athletes would, say, outperform the average fat slob—male or no—off the street). But when he discovers that all medalists will be gender-tested before prizes are awarded, he convinces the resident mad scientist, Professor Farnsworth, to perform a “robot sex change operation” on him.

image

"I can’t watch this ‘cause its creepy and wrong and sick. However, I will watch out of curiosity."

The rest of the episode revolves around Bender being a horrifically sexist stereotype while using his new fame to stoke his ego and scam an actor who falls in love with him. That’s about it. Not even much of a B-plot this time around.

The Good

image

There… isn’t really a lot of good to be found in this episode. It’s filled with sexist jokes and cheap shots as trans women, and a remarkably unfunny conclusion making fun of soap opera sterotypes (were soap operas even still a thing in 2003, when this episode first aired?).

The only moment worth remembering was a comment from Amy when Bender insisted he was making women look good:

"Spluh-uh! You’re making us look like jerks in front of the other genders."

It was a nice bit of nonbinary acknowledgement—intentional or not—for the idea that there is more out there than simply “men” and “women”

The Bad

image

"I tell ya, men are so much better at being women."

Jeezus fucking christ… this episode. I won’t say this is the worst, most ignorant, most transphobic episode of a television show I’ve ever seen, because that award still goes to the South Park episode that literally gives me wake-up-screaming nightmares. But this isn’t much better. Bender becomes a woman solely to trick the Olympic committee and remains a woman afterwards to scam a presumed-heterosexual man-bot, even cheering that he’s a trophy girlfriend. If that’s not playing into the tired old “trans women as tricksters,” then I don’t know what is.

While portraying a woman, Bender wallows in some of the most disgusting sexist stereotypes out there. He glops on make-up, swishes and skips everywhere, dresses trashy, has severe mood swings, and shakes his breasts around while insisting all women should. Bender essentially being the exact, ridiculous caricature that every TERF assumes trans women are anyway. And I’m certain this episode certainly fed into that confirmation bias.

The transformation itself is the same ridiculously swift process you always see in these awful sitcom episodes. The professor swaps his “testosteroil” for “femmzoil,” hammers his body into a new shape, and clips off his antennae (already established canonically as robot genitalia; and what the hell, cis people? How many times to you need to hear “nothing gets cut off” before you stop assuming that women are just de-sexed men?). And somehow transition turns Bender’s feet into high heels. And gives him hair. And clothes. Even though we never see another fembot with hair or clothes. And time and again the entire process causes outrageous mood swings.

The rest of the cast is just awful, transphobic, and/or sexist throughout the entire episode. Fry spends the entire episode demanding reassurance that Bender isn’t really a woman, because apparently that would be the worst thing ever. The Professor—normally just senile and a little crotchety—is aggressively sexist an demeaning. Leela and Amy (both presumably AFAB) spend the entire time talking about transition being gross and unnatural, but then thinking Bender might be right about everything when he gets proposed to.

Even worse, the impetus for the entire plot is the fictional idea of men posing as women to excel in organized sports. This is an issue that has literally ruined the lives and careers of trans and intersex women around the world and lead to humiliating tests to “prove” our femininity. And Futurama thought this issue was worth poking cheap fun at. What’s next? FGM?

The WTF

image

I think the biggest frustration overall isn’t from the episode. It’s been from every cis person I have complained about this episode to. There are cries of “Bender’s not really a trans woman! He’s an over the top con artist!” and “It’s supposed to be funny. It’s a cartoon.” Well, given Futurama's past history of cheap shots at trans women, from the appallingly named “Hermaphrobot” (actually a bad stereotype of a trans woman sex worker) to Bender's breif wrestling career as “The Gender Bender,” Futurama has shown nothing but contempt and derision for trans women, and there’s not reason to believe this episode isn’t more of the same.

Obviously Bender isn’t a trans woman, but that doesn’t stop a poorly-informed cisgender majority from associating this ludicrously bad stereotype with real trans women, or being subconsciously influenced. It’s not as if Futurama (or any other popular media franchise) has ever provided GOOD representation of a trans character to stand in contrast to this depiction. And if this awful episode leans so heavily on time-honored trans stereotypes to prop up the plot, at what point do you stop saying this has nothing to do with trans women?

image

This is bad representation. This is shallow, ignorant, hateful, and sexist, and it’s a giant, stinking pile of transphobia in a show that… isn’t perfect, but is usually pretty good. Futurama gleefully slaps trans women in the face and, like most shallow cis-produced media, completely ignores the existence of trans men. There’s a brief moment of ositivity, but it’s so deeply buried in tripe that you can just easily skip this entire episode and be a better person for it.

Reblog - Posted 11 hours ago - via / Source with 85 notes
tagged as → #transmisogyny #futurama
rbnhood:

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher. 

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.
this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes
bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake


How did this person get to be a teacher? And knowing that their spelling skills are lacking, why should anyone trust whatever else they have to say?

theyre not a teacher… please read the comments before you comment

rbnhood:

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher.

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.

  1. this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
  2. the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
  3. this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
  4. the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
  5. the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
  6. another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
  7. i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
  8. i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
  9. the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes

bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

How did this person get to be a teacher? And knowing that their spelling skills are lacking, why should anyone trust whatever else they have to say?

theyre not a teacher… please read the comments before you comment

eerieglow:

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher. 

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.
this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes
bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake


this is what happens when you say something that only tumblr uses to the real world

lmfao i forgot tumblr invented trans people

eerieglow:

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher.

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.

  1. this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
  2. the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
  3. this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
  4. the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
  5. the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
  6. another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
  7. i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
  8. i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
  9. the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes

bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

this is what happens when you say something that only tumblr uses to the real world

lmfao i forgot tumblr invented trans people

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: RUSSIA

The Russian Academy of Magic is a colossal onion-domed structure drifting aimlessly across the surface of Lake Baikal brought to existence using centuries of levitation charms perfected by a group of Russian witches experimenting with portable floating ice rinks. Self-heating fur scarves are all the rage amongst students and professors alike, although they have been known to overheat from time to time, leading to mild cases of heat stroke. When traditional Quidditch games become dull, players would discard their brooms for skates and duke it out on the frozen surface of the lake.
Reblog - Posted 1 day ago - via / Source with 10,355 notes

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police pick people out of the crowd, then rush forward. Frightening. 

September 28th

Reblog - Posted 1 day ago - via / Source with 16,028 notes
tagged as → #ferguson
jcasanovaandrsn:

If this shit isn’t inspiring, I don’t know what is.

jcasanovaandrsn:

If this shit isn’t inspiring, I don’t know what is.

(Source: jairustehvirus)

tagged as → #weight #weight talk

baby husky and its tennis ball

(Source: yeollovemebaek)

tagged as → #pup

don’t quote outdated cisnormative gender theory at me, I have zero time for that and even less time for you

Reblog - Posted 1 day ago with 5 notes
scrapparchment:

queerpunkhamlet:

scrapparchment:

queerpunkhamlet:

ednaruinedmyaquaberrysweater:

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher. 

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.
this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes
bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

Okay, okay. This popped across my dash and I just want to point something out. What that person wrote on that paper is completely accurate. If that is the last line in your essay, that should be your conclusion. When you end an essay you reiterate your point by stating every major point you’ve made through your essay. 
     As for the quotations or Scare Quotes as you called them, if I would have been grading your paper I would have done the same thing. Not because I want to belittle you or I want to act like those things aren’t real but because when editing an essay, I would quote words or words used in a context that I didn’t understand ( Like the word CIS and CIS Privilege )
    Also, something you said really stood out to me. Asking a transgender person about their birth name. To me, the idea of someone finding the strength to change their life to accommodate the things that THEY want is intriguing…because it’s so strong. If a trans person never wanted someone to call them by their birth name or even talk about it…I would respect that. It’s not my life and not my choices, and I want to RESPECT everyone. I think though, if a person WAS comfortable talking about it, it would be interesting to hear about their journey getting to where they wanted to be.
   Lastly, what would you do if a CIS person told you that they were uncomfortable with you referring to them as that? Would you stop? What would you call them? I am a female, was born a female and never had any plans to live life as a male and I see myself constantly pegged CIS. I don’t think I fit into this category and all it’s negative connotations. Is anyone ever truly comfortable in their own skin? You know what I truly don’t feel comfortable with? Being referred to as a CIS and being grouped with people that are trans phobic.    

you absolute tit, cis doesn’t mean “comfortable in skin” it means NOT TRANS!!! fucking Google trans 101 and don’t fucking regurgitate your nasty ignorance all over my posts

Actually, cisgender can mean:- having a gender presentation that matches your identifying gender. Example: Male identified person wearing typically male clothes, walking with a male stagger and taking up more space in the hallway.- having a gender presentation that aligns with your assigned sex at birth. Example: assigned girl at birth wearing typically feminine clothes, crossing her legs under her desk.- having a gender presentation within the binary of strictly male or strictly female. Example: a person who only presents as male with strict regard against the feminine.
So really, depending on the use of the word, a person can be transgender or transsexual and be cisgender as well, because they are non-gender variant and don’t challenge the gender binary.

okay ya wanna get technical? cisgender means “identifying as a gender other than the one you were assigned at birth” and has FUCK ALL to do with your gender presentation. it’s all about identity, motherfucker

I think you mean transgender with your definition? I’m not sure. Otherwise your definition is contradicting your argument.
So, after drafting this so many times, let’s start with definitions and your statement of simply “cisgender” not being “trans”.  If the word in question is simply what another word is not, we must define the first word before moving on.
The prefix “trans” in Latin in this context refers to “changing”, and can also be referring to the word “transition”. This refers to states that are not constant, but transitional states.  They are places where a person exists while going from one state to another.  With this in mind, we move to the terms “transsexual”, “transgender”, and “trans*”.
Note: We are talking about the definitions of “states”, and not “identities”.
The “transsexual” state would moving between (in a very binary world) one ‘sex’ to the ‘other’ (through cosmetic surgery, HRT, other surgeries, ect.) – but as gender and sex are not collapsible, this is not as relevant. The “transgender” state would be a process of moving to a gender performance or expression opposite from the previous.  "Transgender" would not refer to a change in gender identity, but changing gender expression and presentation to match gender identity.    If a person felt as though their outer gender expression and performance did not match their inner gender identity, they might feel the need to transition their performance and expression to match their identity - hence the term “transgender”.
However, a person does not need to stay in that transitional state forever - there is a point where the ideal is reached.  At that point the need for the “transsexual” or “transgender” marker may not necessarily needed or appropriate.  
Let’s look at it like this:
 
Once the ideal or goal has been reached the person in question is out of the transitional state.  If “transgender” is meant to be transition, does this still leave the person in a “transgender” state?  Does the goal constitute an end?  Is cold water becoming hot water always warming, or does it eventually just become hot water?  Does the definition end once the person reaches point B from point A?
Now: “cisgender”. The term “cisgender” is hard to define because its definition is peer related and has not been legitimized - so by academic standing has no concrete definition.  It is often used casually in average societal context as well as activism as “not trans*”.  However, it has generally been understood to be a place of correspondence between gender identity, gender expression, and gender presentation.  
For reference, gender identity is how you personally identify in the realm of “male” and “female” and everything in between, around, and outside that.  Gender expression would be how you express your gender identity, while gender presentation is more about actions rather than words. It can be conscious (in terms of someone trying to ‘pass’), but is most often done unconsciously. It’s things like how you walk, how much space you take up, how you eat, how you speak.  It’s how people read you.
With that in mind, if the transitional space has been experienced but vacated, and gender expression, presentation, and identity all coincide, a person could be considered “cisgender”.  This is all speaking very binarily of course.  In this very binary world, it could look like this: 
  
If a person has transitioned from male to female (for example) in a very binary way, and their gender presentation and expression now matches their gender identity completely, would it still be considered appropriate to label them as being in a ‘transitional state’? Or would it be more appropriate to label as “cisgender” because they now fall in that binary? 
I am not saying that we should label people who have reached their “finishing point” or “goal” as cisgender, I am just saying that the idea of the cisgender state being after the transgender state is a possibility.  As outsiders, we should allow a person to self identify, not place a label on them.  
So, after all that, I do agree with “cisgender” not being “transgender”.  I do not agree with “cisgender” not being “trans”.  “Trans” can refer to so many different things.  A person can be in a “transsexual” state (moving between sexes), but still fit the criteria of being “cisgender”.  A person could be “transgendered” (having been through the process of being transgender, but having moved out of that state) and still fit “cisgender”.
    But we’re talking about word usage and not identities.  Identify the way you want: you put definition and value to that word, you form what it is.  This is not an attack of trans* identities.  This is a theory of the state of being “transgender” and the state of being “cisgender”.  
Please note: I am not addressing the posted picture.  I am not addressing any of the comments to that picture.  I am only addressing the your comment of “cis doesn’t mean “comfortable in skin” it means NOT TRANS!!!”.

oh my FUCKING God grow the FUCK up. “I the cis know more about trans things than a trans person!!” you are INCORRECT and TRANSPHOBIC, SHUT THE FUCK UP AND DONT POST YOUR FACTUALLY INCORRECT SHIT ON MY POST

scrapparchment:

queerpunkhamlet:

scrapparchment:

queerpunkhamlet:

ednaruinedmyaquaberrysweater:

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher.

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.

  1. this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
  2. the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
  3. this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
  4. the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
  5. the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
  6. another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
  7. i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
  8. i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
  9. the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes

bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

Okay, okay. This popped across my dash and I just want to point something out. What that person wrote on that paper is completely accurate. If that is the last line in your essay, that should be your conclusion. When you end an essay you reiterate your point by stating every major point you’ve made through your essay. 

     As for the quotations or Scare Quotes as you called them, if I would have been grading your paper I would have done the same thing. Not because I want to belittle you or I want to act like those things aren’t real but because when editing an essay, I would quote words or words used in a context that I didn’t understand ( Like the word CIS and CIS Privilege )

    Also, something you said really stood out to me. Asking a transgender person about their birth name. To me, the idea of someone finding the strength to change their life to accommodate the things that THEY want is intriguing…because it’s so strong. If a trans person never wanted someone to call them by their birth name or even talk about it…I would respect that. It’s not my life and not my choices, and I want to RESPECT everyone. I think though, if a person WAS comfortable talking about it, it would be interesting to hear about their journey getting to where they wanted to be.

   Lastly, what would you do if a CIS person told you that they were uncomfortable with you referring to them as that? Would you stop? What would you call them? I am a female, was born a female and never had any plans to live life as a male and I see myself constantly pegged CIS. I don’t think I fit into this category and all it’s negative connotations. Is anyone ever truly comfortable in their own skin? You know what I truly don’t feel comfortable with? Being referred to as a CIS and being grouped with people that are trans phobic.    

you absolute tit, cis doesn’t mean “comfortable in skin” it means NOT TRANS!!! fucking Google trans 101 and don’t fucking regurgitate your nasty ignorance all over my posts

Actually, cisgender can mean:
- having a gender presentation that matches your identifying gender. Example: Male identified person wearing typically male clothes, walking with a male stagger and taking up more space in the hallway.
- having a gender presentation that aligns with your assigned sex at birth. Example: assigned girl at birth wearing typically feminine clothes, crossing her legs under her desk.
- having a gender presentation within the binary of strictly male or strictly female. Example: a person who only presents as male with strict regard against the feminine.

So really, depending on the use of the word, a person can be transgender or transsexual and be cisgender as well, because they are non-gender variant and don’t challenge the gender binary.

okay ya wanna get technical? cisgender means “identifying as a gender other than the one you were assigned at birth” and has FUCK ALL to do with your gender presentation. it’s all about identity, motherfucker

I think you mean transgender with your definition? I’m not sure. Otherwise your definition is contradicting your argument.

So, after drafting this so many times, let’s start with definitions and your statement of simply “cisgender” not being “trans”.  If the word in question is simply what another word is not, we must define the first word before moving on.

The prefix “trans” in Latin in this context refers to “changing”, and can also be referring to the word “transition”. This refers to states that are not constant, but transitional states.  They are places where a person exists while going from one state to another.  With this in mind, we move to the terms “transsexual”, “transgender”, and “trans*”.

Note: We are talking about the definitions of “states”, and not “identities”.

The “transsexual” state would moving between (in a very binary world) one ‘sex’ to the ‘other’ (through cosmetic surgery, HRT, other surgeries, ect.) – but as gender and sex are not collapsible, this is not as relevant. The “transgender” state would be a process of moving to a gender performance or expression opposite from the previous.  "Transgender" would not refer to a change in gender identity, but changing gender expression and presentation to match gender identity.    If a person felt as though their outer gender expression and performance did not match their inner gender identity, they might feel the need to transition their performance and expression to match their identity - hence the term “transgender”.

However, a person does not need to stay in that transitional state forever - there is a point where the ideal is reached.  At that point the need for the “transsexual” or “transgender” marker may not necessarily needed or appropriate.  

Let’s look at it like this:

 

Once the ideal or goal has been reached the person in question is out of the transitional state.  If “transgender” is meant to be transition, does this still leave the person in a “transgender” state?  Does the goal constitute an end?  Is cold water becoming hot water always warming, or does it eventually just become hot water?  Does the definition end once the person reaches point B from point A?

Now: “cisgender”. The term “cisgender” is hard to define because its definition is peer related and has not been legitimized - so by academic standing has no concrete definition.  It is often used casually in average societal context as well as activism as “not trans*”.  However, it has generally been understood to be a place of correspondence between gender identity, gender expression, and gender presentation. 

For reference, gender identity is how you personally identify in the realm of “male” and “female” and everything in between, around, and outside that.  Gender expression would be how you express your gender identity, while gender presentation is more about actions rather than words. It can be conscious (in terms of someone trying to ‘pass’), but is most often done unconsciously. It’s things like how you walk, how much space you take up, how you eat, how you speak.  It’s how people read you.

With that in mind, if the transitional space has been experienced but vacated, and gender expression, presentation, and identity all coincide, a person could be considered “cisgender”.  This is all speaking very binarily of course.  In this very binary world, it could look like this:

  

If a person has transitioned from male to female (for example) in a very binary way, and their gender presentation and expression now matches their gender identity completely, would it still be considered appropriate to label them as being in a ‘transitional state’? Or would it be more appropriate to label as “cisgender” because they now fall in that binary? 

I am not saying that we should label people who have reached their “finishing point” or “goal” as cisgender, I am just saying that the idea of the cisgender state being after the transgender state is a possibility.  As outsiders, we should allow a person to self identify, not place a label on them.  

So, after all that, I do agree with “cisgender” not being “transgender”.  I do not agree with “cisgender” not being “trans”.  “Trans” can refer to so many different things.  A person can be in a “transsexual” state (moving between sexes), but still fit the criteria of being “cisgender”.  A person could be “transgendered” (having been through the process of being transgender, but having moved out of that state) and still fit “cisgender”.

But we’re talking about word usage and not identities.  Identify the way you want: you put definition and value to that word, you form what it is.  This is not an attack of trans* identities.  This is a theory of the state of being “transgender” and the state of being “cisgender”.  

Please note: I am not addressing the posted picture.  I am not addressing any of the comments to that picture.  I am only addressing the your comment of “cis doesn’t mean “comfortable in skin” it means NOT TRANS!!!”.

oh my FUCKING God grow the FUCK up. “I the cis know more about trans things than a trans person!!” you are INCORRECT and TRANSPHOBIC, SHUT THE FUCK UP AND DONT POST YOUR FACTUALLY INCORRECT SHIT ON MY POST

hawk-and-handsaw:

if u are a cis girl, here are some things not to say to trans girls or transfeminine ppl 

  • you do makeup better than I do!
  • you have better legs than I do!
  • you’re prettier than I am! 
  • etc

these compliments are just a way the disguise your shock at the femininity of “fake” women, compared to you, a “real” woman. stop. 

parkway-nosedive:

trauntwave:

not every single long sentence is a song title by fall out boy 

there are two ways to read this

blue-eyed-hanji:

markspants:

notyourexrotic:

HP Goblet of Fire Headcanon: Beauxbatons was primarily a Muslim wizarding school.

(photo from livesandliesofwizards, which was the first thing I thought of when I ran into this passage while rereading the Harry Potter books)

(and yes I know the horses drink whisky, which is not exactly halal, sshhh)

This is actually a really probable and possible headcanon, and not just because of the highlighted lines. For those of you who don’t know - during the ever-lovely age of Imperialism, when Western Europe invaded other countries for shits and giggles, and the sun never set on the British Empire, France invaded Northern Africa. 

Nowadays, it’s called the Maghreb, and it is comprised of Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia, and declares French to be an official language. It is an area in which Islam is the official, and most popular religion, and an area from which the majority of France’s immigrant population is drawn. 

While it is entirely likely that the countries of the Maghreb have their own schools, the immense, and growing population of French speaking, Muslim immigrants in from the Maghreb to France drastically increases the likelihood that even an upperclass school such as Beauxbatons would include a portion of students from that demographic. And I think that’s just really cool.

HEADCANON FUCKING ACCEPTED

no no no this is a COLONIALIST narrative, Muslim beauxbatons is great but you don’t have to go “because of European colonialism!!!” like… Muslims are everywhere don’t do that

btw all “man in a dress” gags are only coherent in the context of transmisogyny so maybe stop making & reblogging them. thanks!!

(Source: autogynephile)

Reblog - Posted 2 days ago - via / Source with 3,398 notes

benepla:

the best parralell to ebony dark’ness dementia raven way calling everyone “preps” is holden caulfiend calling everyone “phonies” and i wish that was even half of a joking literary comment

Reblog - Posted 2 days ago - via / Source with 88 notes
scrapparchment:

queerpunkhamlet:

ednaruinedmyaquaberrysweater:

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher. 

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.
this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes
bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

Okay, okay. This popped across my dash and I just want to point something out. What that person wrote on that paper is completely accurate. If that is the last line in your essay, that should be your conclusion. When you end an essay you reiterate your point by stating every major point you’ve made through your essay. 
     As for the quotations or Scare Quotes as you called them, if I would have been grading your paper I would have done the same thing. Not because I want to belittle you or I want to act like those things aren’t real but because when editing an essay, I would quote words or words used in a context that I didn’t understand ( Like the word CIS and CIS Privilege )
    Also, something you said really stood out to me. Asking a transgender person about their birth name. To me, the idea of someone finding the strength to change their life to accommodate the things that THEY want is intriguing…because it’s so strong. If a trans person never wanted someone to call them by their birth name or even talk about it…I would respect that. It’s not my life and not my choices, and I want to RESPECT everyone. I think though, if a person WAS comfortable talking about it, it would be interesting to hear about their journey getting to where they wanted to be.
   Lastly, what would you do if a CIS person told you that they were uncomfortable with you referring to them as that? Would you stop? What would you call them? I am a female, was born a female and never had any plans to live life as a male and I see myself constantly pegged CIS. I don’t think I fit into this category and all it’s negative connotations. Is anyone ever truly comfortable in their own skin? You know what I truly don’t feel comfortable with? Being referred to as a CIS and being grouped with people that are trans phobic.    

you absolute tit, cis doesn’t mean “comfortable in skin” it means NOT TRANS!!! fucking Google trans 101 and don’t fucking regurgitate your nasty ignorance all over my posts

Actually, cisgender can mean:- having a gender presentation that matches your identifying gender. Example: Male identified person wearing typically male clothes, walking with a male stagger and taking up more space in the hallway.- having a gender presentation that aligns with your assigned sex at birth. Example: assigned girl at birth wearing typically feminine clothes, crossing her legs under her desk.- having a gender presentation within the binary of strictly male or strictly female. Example: a person who only presents as male with strict regard against the feminine.So really, depending on the use of the word, a person can be transgender or transsexual and be cisgender as well, because they are non-gender variant and don’t challenge the gender binary.

okay ya wanna get technical? cisgender means “identifying as a gender other than the one you were assigned at birth” and has FUCK ALL to do with your gender presentation. it’s all about identity, motherfucker

scrapparchment:

queerpunkhamlet:

ednaruinedmyaquaberrysweater:

queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher.

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.

  1. this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
  2. the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
  3. this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
  4. the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
  5. the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
  6. another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
  7. i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
  8. i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
  9. the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes

bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

Okay, okay. This popped across my dash and I just want to point something out. What that person wrote on that paper is completely accurate. If that is the last line in your essay, that should be your conclusion. When you end an essay you reiterate your point by stating every major point you’ve made through your essay. 

     As for the quotations or Scare Quotes as you called them, if I would have been grading your paper I would have done the same thing. Not because I want to belittle you or I want to act like those things aren’t real but because when editing an essay, I would quote words or words used in a context that I didn’t understand ( Like the word CIS and CIS Privilege )

    Also, something you said really stood out to me. Asking a transgender person about their birth name. To me, the idea of someone finding the strength to change their life to accommodate the things that THEY want is intriguing…because it’s so strong. If a trans person never wanted someone to call them by their birth name or even talk about it…I would respect that. It’s not my life and not my choices, and I want to RESPECT everyone. I think though, if a person WAS comfortable talking about it, it would be interesting to hear about their journey getting to where they wanted to be.

   Lastly, what would you do if a CIS person told you that they were uncomfortable with you referring to them as that? Would you stop? What would you call them? I am a female, was born a female and never had any plans to live life as a male and I see myself constantly pegged CIS. I don’t think I fit into this category and all it’s negative connotations. Is anyone ever truly comfortable in their own skin? You know what I truly don’t feel comfortable with? Being referred to as a CIS and being grouped with people that are trans phobic.    

you absolute tit, cis doesn’t mean “comfortable in skin” it means NOT TRANS!!! fucking Google trans 101 and don’t fucking regurgitate your nasty ignorance all over my posts

Actually, cisgender can mean:
- having a gender presentation that matches your identifying gender. Example: Male identified person wearing typically male clothes, walking with a male stagger and taking up more space in the hallway.
- having a gender presentation that aligns with your assigned sex at birth. Example: assigned girl at birth wearing typically feminine clothes, crossing her legs under her desk.
- having a gender presentation within the binary of strictly male or strictly female. Example: a person who only presents as male with strict regard against the feminine.

So really, depending on the use of the word, a person can be transgender or transsexual and be cisgender as well, because they are non-gender variant and don’t challenge the gender binary.

okay ya wanna get technical? cisgender means “identifying as a gender other than the one you were assigned at birth” and has FUCK ALL to do with your gender presentation. it’s all about identity, motherfucker